How Do I Manage a Stockpile?

I am not an expert on this topic but I will share with you what my experience has been. Below I will outline some things that have worked for me pertaining to managing a stockpile.

Methods for organizing my freezer stockpile

The FIFO (First-in-First-out) method is used mainly on my meat, bread and dairy items. Because these items are purchased before the sell by/expiration date but used after the date, I must monitor what comes in versus what goes out.

I keep track out it all by rotating. When an item item such as margarine to my deep freezer, I take out what is already in there and put the newest purchases beneath the older. I do the same with milk and meat.

Methods for organizing my shelf stockpile

The Expiration date method is really quite simple. Each time I buy new items they are stored in groups with other like items. For example I may have Kraft and Hidden Valley Salad dressing on the shelf. I always stack the nearest expiration dates in the front. I keep everything organized by rotating the items when I put them away. Keeping inventory is a regular part of my weekly homemaking schedule. It is one that my oldest daughter has taken responsibility of and she does an awesome job.

Preventing Waste

Luke 6:38
“Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom. For with the same measure that ye mete withal it shall be measured to you again.”

I have only had (1) things waste in the entire time that I have had a stockpile. One was a salad dressing. I now realize that ranch dressing doesn’t last as long as the other varieties.

Overall, the key to preventing wastefulness that has worked for our family has been to give away things and keep only what we need.

What do I need?

To figure out the answer to this question you have to get a general idea of what your family uses per month and multiply that number by how much of a stockpile you want to build.

Our goal is one year.

We use 2 boxes of cereal per week, so multiplied by 52 (the number of weeks in a year) tells me that I must buy 104 of cereal per year. Cereal happens to have a 1-2 year shelf life and stocks well. So when I can pay $24 for 22 boxes of cereal, I take full advantage of this sort of deal.

I have bought 104 boxes of cereal 2 times over but I have given away so much cereal that I never have 104 boxes of cereal on my shelves.

Logically, giving away so much would leave some to believe that their needs won’t be met. But I don’t operate by logic alone. I apply biblical principles like Luke 6:38 and anticipate that God will keep His promise.

~Create a method of organizing your stock-pile

~Don’t keep it all for yourself

We are all still trying to find ways to be better Keepers at Home…so I’d love for you to share any tips you may have for managing a stockpile.


  1. says

    In my house we sometimes keep an Eat It! list. This is a list, posted at eye level on the fridge door, of foods that are perishable or super-stocked-up. When we are thinking about what to cook for everybody or what to eat for a snack, the list provides inspiration as well as helping us use up the things that need to be used.
    .-= ‘Becca´s last blog ..Excellent Educational Toy! =-.


    The Proverbs Wife Reply:


    This is a great idea Becca. I use the FIFO (first in first out) method which keeps things from going bad. Also because I donate to the church pantry monthly things never seem to go to waste.

    Keeping track of what needs to be used is a very important part of keeping and organized stockpile.

    I looked at your “We eat this Post” and the seaweed sprinkles sound exciting. We already eat lot’s of Lentil and Tofu in many meals.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge